Behavioral Goals

Teachers need to constantly remind themselves that they are the targets of disturbing classroom behavior, and that their reactions tend to sustain and strengthen undesirable behavior. Before teachers can begin to assist individual children, they must stop giving undue attention, fighting, retaliating, or accepting student’s displays of inability. That is the first step in any corrective program.

Students who constantly disrupt, invite attention, rebel, or violate order, are discouraged individuals who feel that they cannot find a place in the class through constructive and cooperative behaviors, and consequently turn to more destructive and inadequate behaviors in their attempt to find a sense of significance.

There are a number of processes designed to help pupils to develop more adequate ways of behaving, but before these approaches can be used, teachers must stop responding to unacceptable behaviors As a first step, teachers should train themselves to go against their first impulse and, consequently, break the detrimental cycle whereby a student acts and a teacher reacts.

A two part interactive Teacher Teaser may be found below. Part one looks at matching a behavior with the form of power goal. Part two focuses on how a teacher might feel about a student’s misbehavior.

Instructions:

Simply click on your choice from the options provided.

Teachers need to constantly remind themselves that they are the targets of disturbing classroom behavior, and that their reactions tend to sustain and strengthen undesirable behavior.

1. From a teacher’s perspective, match the behavior with the form of power goal.

‘I wish you would stop contradicting everything I say’.

 
 

2. From a teacher’s perspective, match the behavior with the form of power goal.

‘I am not going to tell you again. Open that book and begin your work’.

 
 

3. From a teacher’s perspective, match the behavior with the form of power goal.

‘If you continue to fight with other students, it will be a trip to the principal’s office.’

 
 

4. From a teacher’s perspective, match the behavior with the form of power goal.
‘That is the third time this term you have left your books at home’.

 
 

5. Given the four choices below how do you think the teacher feels about a student’s misbehavior?
‘You are driving me crazy with your constant talk’

 
 
 
 

6. Given the four choices below how do you think the teacher feels about a student’s misbehavior?
I give up with you, Nathan’

 
 
 
 

7. Given the four choices below how do you think the teacher feels about a student’s misbehavior?
‘You are not going to get away with that, young lady.’

 
 
 
 

8. Given the four choices below how do you think the teacher feels about a student’s misbehavior?
‘How could you do that to me, John?’